Beer · Fusion · Korean · Restaurants

Best of Kin

L came home early and asked if I wanted to start the long weekend on the right foot. Before he even finished his sentence, I rattled off a list: Best of Kin, The Greek Corner Calgary, or Hanbo. We decided on Best of Kin, as the roads were still icy, and the brewery was closest to us. Let’s listen to “Inner City Pressure” by Flight of the Conchords.

We each ordered a flight of beers ($12 for 4 x 4oz pours). As we sampled each other’s selection, I noticed the crowd reminded me of the professor emeritus at the University of Calgary. L and I were the only ones not wearing North Face jackets. I kept waiting for Dr. B, my master’s supervisor, to jump out and ask me how my stats class was going. The volume of the music was audibly quiet, which suited the clientele.

Barley Pop was our favourite beer, as we found it light with pleasant notes. I thought Dad’s Beer was clean and easy to drink. Summer Crush was sweet and reminded me a little of Kool-Aid. L enjoyed the IPA, which I found bitter with less carbonation than the other beers.

I liked the Sailor’s Delight – it was a tasty coffee stout. Mom Perm was another standout – fun, light and a little sour. I appreciated the beer’s subtle flavours, almost wine-like and quaffable.

L and I were blown away by the food, particularly the Smoked Korean BBQ Chicken Sandwich ($17). The fragrance and taste of the smoke were unreal. The Kewpie mayo added another layer of richness. The chicken thigh meat was satiny smooth. The jalapenos and kimchi slaw mingled with spicy heat and a pickled, tart crunch. This chicken is the best BBQ I have ever tasted. Personally, I think the prices are too low for the quality they are serving up. Cost-wise, this place charges less than your average pub on 17th Avenue.

The Fish and Chips ($19) was wickedly decadent. Our server, when asked, told us the seasonal day boat fish was blue cod. I loved the flaky, buttery filet and the crispy, melt-in-your-mouth batter.

The tartar sauce was thick and herby, similar in freshness to the homemade tzatziki we would eat in Greece. Even the coleslaw rocked – the vegetables were crunchy, and you could taste the freshness of the ingredients.

The fries were fresh-cut, thick cut and mealy on the inside. The golden brown fries were so good we didn’t need any dip. The portion of fries that came with the fish was more than generous. I could feel myself puffing up from all the salt and deep-fried goodness.

I noticed the chefs put great care into prepping the plates. You can taste that same attention to detail in the flavour and quality in the food. Days later, we were still raving about the smoked BBQ chicken. I’m dying to try the beef brisket on my next visit. The BBQ chicken is so mind-blowing that Best of Kin is on Hitting the Sauce’s list of best eats in Calgary.

Cheap Eats · Fast Food · Korean

Chicken Omnibus

L and I visited our adorable nephew in Bowness. After a successful playdate, we decided to order dinner from Chicken Omnibus. I’m glad we checked it out, as this is our new favourite place for Korean-style fried chicken. For this post, let’s listen to “Do You Believe in Magic” by The Loving’ Spoonful.

I noticed K-Pop music playing in the background when we entered the restaurant. The interior is bright and colourful. While we waited to order, we looked at the pictures on the menu, which described each item in detail. We ordered the Dak Gang Jeong Combo ($12.99), Chicken Combo ($12.99), and Onion Rings ($5.50).

Our combos came with a pop and a sauce. We each asked for the sauce on the side because we planned on eating our food at home and didn’t want the chicken to become soggy. But after seeing some of the food come out of the kitchen, I told L we would eat at the restaurant.

This small mom-and-pop operation cooks everything fresh. Our food arrived at our table within ten minutes, so hot I burned the roof of my mouth.

The portions are generous. The double-battered fries were piled high on our basket. The coating on the potatoes reminded me of Costco fries. The onion rings looked like it was the frozen type, but it was still good. The batter was thin and melted in your mouth. We dipped our onion rings in the spicy aioli, ranch, and a sweet, spicy sauce.

The star of the show is the chicken. My pieces were juicy and meaty. The chicken tasted real, unlike the congealed stuff KFC sells and superior to the texture and flavour of Popeye’s. The batter was light, crusty, and so well seasoned that I didn’t need any of the sauces. The plumpness of Omnibus’s chicken reminds me of Church’s and LA Chicken in Richmond, BC, but with a crunchier, tastier batter.

L liked my chicken over his Dak Gang Jeong (sweet, crispy boneless chicken). I tried his nugget-like meat, and I also preferred my order of regular bone-in chicken.

L said the food tasted authentic, and Omnibus reminded him of the local places he would frequent in Korea. Omnibus isn’t a chain, and the chef was so genuinely friendly it made me want to return. I heard two customers exclaim this was the best chicken they ever ate. I saw another customer digging into a plate overflowing with katsu (breaded chicken cutlet) that looked delicious.

The next time I have a cheat meal, I’m getting the fried chicken again or perhaps a chicken burger. Hitting the Sauce gives Omnibus two phat thumbs up.

Korean

Namsan Korean Cuisine

I love going out on Friday night. I figure I have the perfect excuse. By the end of the week, we are out of groceries and too tired to cook, and we can celebrate the end of a busy week. For this post, let’s listen to “That’s All” by Genesis. 

I wanted to check out Namsan Korean Cuisine. I’ve heard only good things about the food, but a Facebook Calgary Roast and Toast inspired me to dine here, detailing how the owner of Namsan went out of his way to help a stranger in need.

I called beforehand to make reservations, as I heard it gets busy. Namsan is located in an old house on the edge of the downtown core. L wondered how this house survived when none of the other buildings remained. 

We shared a large Asahi ($9), Seafood Pajeon ($17) and Cheese Dak Galbi ($42). While we waited for our food, we munched on the complimentary banchan (side dishes) and sipped on our beer after cheering each other in Korean. Geonbae!

Of the bunch, our favourite side dish was the sweet pickles. The texture was unique – crunchy yet bendy. The kimchi was red and wet from the spicy seasoning. I found the julienned fish cakes sweet and chewy. The chilled sprout and macaroni salad were standard. 

Our seafood pancake was crispy, hot and a little oily. The sweet flavour of the crunchy onions and charred green onions were prominent. The batter was light and just enough to bind all the vegetables and calamari together. I didn’t mind that there wasn’t an abundance of seafood because the pancake was so delicious that I didn’t even need to use the dipping sauce. L taught in Korea for a semester and thought the pajeon was authentic. I would order this again. 

I was excited when a big skillet full of spicy stir-fried chicken arrived at our table. Our server turned on the burner. We watched patiently as the cheese melted over the chicken, sweet potatoes and rice cakes. L noted the chicken was of good quality. I didn’t find the sauce spicy, though L could detect some heat. I liked how every time we went to scoop a piece of chicken or rice cakes, the strands of cheese would stretch from the skillet to our bowl. When grilled, the rice cake was chewy and gelatinous. 

After we made a dent in our dak galbi, our server added a bowl of rice and made a stir-fry. I preferred the dak galbi with the fried rice because the sweet potato, rice, and cheese melded together into a tasty, Korean-style risotto. 

There was so much food we made three meals from the leftovers. The following day, the cold pancake was nearly as delicious as the previous night. Namsam is popular for good reasons. The service is warm and friendly, and the portions are generous. Since it is open until 1:00 a.m., I bet it’s a fun spot with the youngins. When we left, a large crowd of customers was waiting for a table. Hitting the Sauce gives Namsan two phat thumbs up.

Chinatown · Korean

Sso Yummy

 
After my appointment in Inglewood, I planned to order lunch from Xich Lo in Eau Claire. However, I remembered L was craving kimbap (Korean sushi) all week. I heard good things about the food at Sso Yummy in Chinatown, so I selflessly forwent my banh mi (Vietnamese sandwich) for his kimbap. For this post, let’s listen to “Butter” by BTS.

I ordered the Yummy Combo ($11) and Spam Kimbap ($7.50). The combo comes with a soup, tteokbokki (spicy stir-fried rice cakes) and two mini boong uh bbang (Korean fish shaped pastry). There was so much food in the combo that next time I pick up lunch, I’ll just order two kimbaps for us to share.

Sso Yummy does an excellent job packing up takeout orders – each dish was neatly wrapped. The soup was basic – clear, hot and salty. I like the flavouring from the fish cakes and the simplicity of the broth because the soup help to cleanse my palate in between bites of kimbap and tteokbokki.

This was my first time trying tteokbokki. The texture of the rice cake was chewy, squishy and a little gummy. The red gochujang sauce was spicy. I enjoyed the addition of the greens and bits of fish cake in the sauce.

The kimbap is delicious. The spam and crab added a savoury saltiness to each bite. The rice, fluffy egg omelette and tofu were soft and so tasty. The rice was still warm and perfectly cooked. The daikon and pickled carrots added a pleasant sweet and tart crunch. Even the seaweed tasted extra fresh. Of the two kimbaps, I prefer the stronger flavour in the spam roll over the ham version. On our next visit, L wants to try the spicy pork kimbap.

The boong uh bbang was a nice finish to our meal. I enjoyed the subtle flavour in the creamy custard filling. The pastry reminded me of a waffle – spongy and sweet.

We found the food fresh, inexpensive and a healthier alternative than some of our usual takeout choices. Our meal was cheaper than any fast food restaurant and infinitely better quality. Hitting the Sauce gives Sso Yummy two phat thumbs up.

Fast Food · Korean

Yum Yum BBQ – Southwood Corner

I invited Lovegastrogirl over for dinner. She agreed on the condition that she would pick up food. We did the whole Chinese etiquette hospitality battle until she ferociously threatened not to come. I meekly backed down and thanked her. I want Lovegastrogirl to meet my mom one day. She’d meet her match.  For this post, and in honour of Stampede, let’s listen to “God’s Gonna Cut You Down” by Johnny Cash.

Fried chicken is my kryptonite. Lovegastrogirl brought over Yum Yum BBQ from Southwood Corner, her favourite location. I asked her not to bring so much food because the last time she did a fried chicken drop off, I spent the next day hovering over my sink, munching on cold chicken. She laughed and said that was smart move, as the crumbs would go directly into the sink and not my floor.

Photo credit: Lovegastrogirl

Lovegastrogirl has a listening problem. She brought over enough food for four hungry people. She ordered L’s favourite chicken – the Shallot Bone-In (12 pieces, $27.99), Beef Japchae ($14.99), BBQ Beef Poutine ($14.49), and Pickled Radish ($1). I reheated the chicken and poutine in the oven and microwaved the noodles. I asked Lovegastrogirl to take a picture for my blog. She floofed up the shallots and stood on a chair to angle her shots while I looked on with amazement at the effort she puts in.

Photo credit: Lovegastrogirl

The chicken was succulent and gleaming white. After rebaking the chicken, the teriyaki glaze created a brittle, sweet tasting shell. Some of the shallots were wilted from the reheating, which I prefer because the greens reminded me more of watercress. I like that the batter on Yum Yum chicken isn’t as oily as Popeyes or Wow Chicken.

Photo credit: Lovegastrogirl

Despite being saturated with melted cheese and dark, salty gravy, the fries held up. The barbecued beef was sliced thin and tasty. The ridges in the crinkle fries helps to load up on the toppings.

Photo credit: Lovegastrogirl

The sweet potato noodles were sticky and spicy. The noodles stuck together with the vegetables and beef bulgogi, so with each bite, you get a little bit of everything in one mouthful. In both the poutine and japchae, the flavour of the beef stood out.

I insisted Lovegastrogirl take the leftover chicken to Pomp. I did take out one drumstick to eat for later. Some habits are hard to break. Thank you Lovegastrogirl for a delicious dinner. Next time I’ll have you over for dinner and I’ll order fried chicken from Jin Bar or Gorilla Whale.

Chinatown · Korean · Restaurants

No Man’s Dinner – Moon Korean BBQ

On Thursday, @loaf2go and I hosted our third No Man’s Dinner at Moon Korean BBQ. We named this dinner “Lovers’ Feast” because the event was the night before Valentine’s Day and we wanted to order from the all-you-can-eat menu. For this post, let’s listen to “Love Machine” by The Miracles.

Originally, our reservation was for 12 guests. By noon that day, one member said she was sick. A couple of hours later, another member said something came up. Loaf2go, T, YYCFoodiePak and Mr. YYCFoodie arrived early at Moon Korean BBQ. I arrived two minutes before 6:30 p.m. Pink Baller  arrived exactly on time. True to her name, Pink Baller brought a cake from Wow Bakery.

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Loaf2go, YYCFoodiePak and I were excited to finally meet Pink Baller. We all follow her on Instagram and I’m intrigued with her travel posts. I like to be frugal when I travel, so I enjoy living vicariously through her. In her last trip, I followed her fancy footsteps to top restaurants, helicopter excursions, and a Vegas Knights hockey game.

sides

By 7:00 p.m., I made the executive decision to order our food, even though Seashell and her guest were absent. We ordered from the basic all-you-can-eat menu ($24.50): fried chili tofu; Korean vegetarian pancake; braised pork side ribs; sweet and sour pork; spicy pork bulgogi; spicy beef bulgogi; pork ribs; spicy pork bulgogi; spicy chicken; kimchi; bean sprouts; sweet potatoes; lettuce; beef udon soup; vegetarian japchae; and cold buckwheat noodles.

Our server told us to order some dishes in smaller quantities as he thought we ordered too much. I’m glad we listened to him because it was a lot of food. Below are pictures I stole from Pink Baller and Loaf2go’s Instagram accounts. All the photos under NoMansDinner are Loaf2go’s photos.

tofu

The fried chili tofu wasn’t that spicy. The exterior was crispy and the tofu on the inside was light with an airy texture. I thought the tofu could have used a little salt.

pancake

The vegetarian pancake was cooked well – each side was nicely crisp. I would have liked it with some seafood or more sauce as I found the flavours muted.

nood pull

Pink Baller and I thought the vegetarian japae noodles were delicious. The noodles were soft and pliable with a sweet, salty, savoury seasoning. The medley of onions and greens were cooked so that it still had a bite to it. Loaf2go noted there was too much white pepper in the noodles.

ribs

The Korean BBQ meats were the best thing on the menu. All the meats arrived hot and freshly cooked. Our group’s favourite was the pork ribs. The pork was tender and juicy. I’d order the pork ribs and spicy chicken again.

pork

The pork side ribs reminded me of pi gwat – a Chinese dim sum dish of steamed pork ribs with black beans sauce. The ribs were meaty and soft. We were given one condiment to use for our BBQ meats – a reddish sauce that reminded me of Chinese mustard. The meats weren’t heavily seasoned. Loaf2go said for Korean food, she is used to more potency and individual flavour notes within a dish as opposed to one sauce.

pork bones

YYCFoodiePak enjoyed the cold buckwheat noodles. I found the coldness of the buckwheat noodles jarring. I preferred the beef udon. The broth was flavourful and the beef itself was very tasty. The noodles were hot and slippery.

tofu bite

I thought the sweet and sour pork was similar to ginger beef. The pork was cut into strips and battered. The sauce was light and syrupy.

sweet and sour

We were so full, we didn’t order a second round. At this time, we began to play the guilt trip game because no one wanted to eat more but we were worried we would get charged for the leftover food.

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Loaf2go took on the beef udon and complained that she was doing all the eating. I rolled my eyes and said I came on hot and heavy in the beginning of the meal and I ate more than anyone. I could see Pink Baller was tactful and she politely picked at the sweet and sour pork and a pork side rib. T finished up the japae noodles and ate more of the BBQ meats. YYCFoodiePak said she was going to order strawberry ice-cream. She’s not a team player. Mr. YYCFoodie ate more meats and reassured us we wouldn’t get charged for the little amount left on the plates. I could tell he’s done the all-you-can-eat before.

ake

Pink Baller was so sweet to bring a cake to her first No Man’s Dinner. I love combination of the fresh strawberries with whip cream and vanilla sponge cake. Strawberry cake is simplicity at its best. I told Pink Baller she’s invited to my upcoming fried chicken party, an off-the-record No Man’s Dinner event.

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For all-you-can-eat, Moon Korean BBQ doesn’t disappoint. Unlike other similar venues, all the hot food tasted freshly prepared. Stay tuned for the next No Man’s Dinner at Sukiyaki House. However, we are going to have to enforce our house rules. Bring out the Chinese feather duster!

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For those of you who didn’t grow up in a Chinese household, the chicken feather duster is used to discipline children for the slightest infraction. Before my father would use this atrocious device to “clean house” he would solemnly say, “This is going to hurt me more than you.” Based on the expression on his face as he levied the feather duster on our tiny, outstretched hands, he didn’t look like he was suffering.

Moon Korean BBQ Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Chinatown · Korean · Restaurants

Bon-ga – Chinatown

Ay Caramba took me out for lunch for my birthday. She surprised me in the morning with two beautiful blue bowls along with some coconut, almond and chocolate mix. She also ordered me to take a lieu day on Friday, so I could prepare for Beep Beep’s visit. For my birthday weekend posts, I’m going to play my favourite tunes. First up is Yo-Yo Ma’s “Bach Cello Suite No.1 Prelude”.

I wanted to keep our group small, so I invited Asian Persuasion, Office Dad, and Pak_to_eating. Lam Jam emailed us earlier in the week and wanted to meet for lunch on the same day, so I extended the invitation to him as well. When we left the office, a coworker mentioned that we were a homogeneous bunch and wondered if it was a prerequisite to be Asian to join our lunch. I thought that was funny because whenever other people go for lunch, I’m sure no one would think – “Wow! That group has something in common – they are all Caucasian!”

As with most Korean restaurants, we received complimentary banchan – tiny side dishes that compliment the meal. When we asked for a refill, our server gave us double the amount. I liked the pungent pieces of kimchi, marinated mung bean sprouts, and musaengchae (white radish).

We ordered Gamjatang – a boiling pot of pork bones, potatoes, and cabbage. I asked for only a little spice because Ay Caramba can’t handle the heat. I know this is a popular dish, but I find it too cumbersome and messy to eat the meat still attached to the bones. I wouldn’t order this on my own.

I specifically ordered the Spicy Squid and Pork Sizzling Plate ($32.99) because of Bruce K. He raved about this dish on Yelp. He’s quite the intense foodie, so I wanted to see what the big deal was about.

This dish is a winner. The toothsome slices of soft squid and the tender pieces of pork were delicious. Make sure you eat this dish with rice, as it soaks up all that yummy sauce. I didn’t find this dish spicy at all. I wonder if it was because I told the owner that Aycaramba doesn’t like spice.

Asian Persuasion wanted to order the Pajun – a savoury seafood pancake ($19.99). Considering how thick the pancake was, I surprised the batter was so light and crispy. I’ve had pajun that’s gummy and heavy.

The pancake contained squid, shrimp and greens. I thought it was a tad light on the seafood. Still, very tasty and I would order this dish again.

One of the best dishes was the Japchae ($18.50). The sweet potato noodles were bouncy, sweet and savoury from the sauce. I liked the combination of the crunchy vegetables, beef and assorted mushrooms. Asian Persuasion said it is easy to make japchae, as it’s just a few key ingredients. I have made japchae before but it didn’t taste nearly as good as Bon-ga’s. I think I don’t put enough sesame oil and sugar in my version.

Persuasion wanted to try the Asian Beef Bone Soup ($13.99). The broth was milky white and cloudy. The meat was soft. Office Dad shared a piece with me, as the bowl was pretty small.

The flavour of the broth was mild. I thought this was the weakest dish, it just lacked the vibrancy of all the other dishes. However, a hot soup is nice as it rounds out the meal and warms you up.

I would return again with a group to try the Korean BBQ combos. Just a heads up – Bonga is a small mom and pop operation. During our lunch, the restaurant filled up with other groups. The owner and one server were kept busy. The owner would still checked in on us and whenever we needed anything, there was a buzzer at the table. Thanks Ay Caramba for setting up this lunch date and treating me. Hitting the Sauce gives Bon-ga two fat thumbs.

Bon-Ga Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Japanese · Korean · Restaurants

Katsuten -L’s bday lunch

It was L’s birthday on Saturday. I asked him where he wanted to go for lunch. He said no where far and something warm. I reminded him of Katsuten, which is a five-minute walk from our house. For this post, let’s listen to “Shape of Youby Ed Sheeran, with a dance choreographed by Kyle Hanagami.

Katsuten doesn’t take reservations. When we arrived at 12:30 p.m., the room was more than half full. Soon after, there was a line-up. Pro tip. If your group is bigger than two people, come right when the restaurant opens to guarantee a seat.

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There was only one server for the whole restaurant. Despite the line-up, takeout and serving the rapid turnover of tables, she remained cool as a cucumber and efficient. We were well looked after and felt service was uncompromised despite how busy the restaurant became.

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L and I shared the Cheese Katsu ($17.90) and Creamy Curry Udon ($14). The katsu comes with miso soup, rice and a cabbage salad. In my past visits, the only thing that prevented me from loving this restaurant was the rice. Well, that’s been rectified. The rice was good. The grain looked like what I use at home – Kokuho Rose. I like how firm each grain of rice is and that it has a bit of a chew. The cabbage was drizzled with a yellow dressing that was nice and bright, which was refreshing after eating fried food.

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The cheese was warm and soft. Against the fluffy, fried breading, it was like eating a grilled cheese sandwich, but more decadent. The cheese makes the katsu tasted even richer. I would recommend sharing this dish.

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Our server instructed us to mix the topping with the noodles because the potato cream is cold. Marvelous. The noodles were chewy and slippery in a heady curry gravy of bacon, mushrooms, carrots, garlic, and green onions.

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L thought the combination of curry and cream was unusual and delicious. The curry wasn’t hot or overpowering. More of a hint that complimented the bacon and potato cream.

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The katsu here rivals the best I’ve tried in Japan. I didn’t realize how full I was until I got up to pay the bill. For this feast, our bill was only $35. I’d say that’s a steal for katsu of this calibre. I love this place so much, I’m putting it Hitting the Sauce’s list of favourite restaurants in Calgary. I give Katsuten two fat thumbs up.

Katsuten Japanese Restaurant Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Korean · Kyoto · Restaurants

Kyoto – Nikuya no Daidokoro

L and I found one of our best meals by accident. Initially, I found a yakitori bar in Pontocho by Kamogawa River. We entered the restaurant and a server confirmed there were two seats available. By the entrance, there was a table of salary men smoking. L was so irritated by the smoke he didn’t even bow and say sorry in Japanese to the hostess before abruptly leaving. L told me we would find somewhere better. I didn’t believe him and I threw a bitch fit (BF) a la White Chicks. After walking around for 15 minutes, I told L to follow the couple ahead of us. For this post, let’s listen to Bitch by Meredith Brooks.

I could sense this couple knew where they were going. I felt that they knew we were following them when we entered the elevator and didn’t press any button. They looked nervously at each other and then the gentleman turned around to say something to me in Japanese. When the doors opened, we discovered we were at an all-you-can-eat Korean BBQ Restaurant – Nikuya no Daidokoro.

menu

For about $27 US, we could eat an array of chicken, pork, one type of beef, vegetables and a huge salad bar with soup and dessert. For an extra $3 US, we enjoyed unlimited draft beer. The quality of the meats and vegetables were very good. Far superior to the Korean buffets in Vancouver and Calgary.

meat before fired

L ordered all the meats and took care of grilling all the food. We didn’t stink too bad of meat after we left, because the fan did a great job of sucking up all the smoke.

meat

We tried most of the meats on the menu. The only one I didn’t like was Pope’s Nose, as it was too fatty and hard. The wiener was particularly delicious – once you crunched through the casing, it popped with sausage juice.

weiner

I ate several plates of banchan – Korean side dishes. Soybean sprouts, cold spinach, watercress tofu salad, cabbage and soybean paste, and edamame. I put the edamame on the BBQ and then sprinkled it with salt. I realized that everyone else eats them cold when the servers and other customers would give me a double take.

edanmae

There aren’t a whole lot of vegetables and fruits readily available in Kyoto, at least not in our area. So I filled up on vegetables. I grilled peppers, mushrooms, onions, cabbage, eggplant and shiso peppers. There were also a ton of sauces and salts to choose from.

charred veg

I felt remorse for my BF earlier so I tried to pay for supper. L wouldn’t let me which made me feel even worse. I liked this place so much, I insisted on taking him out later on in the week and splurging for the wagyu beef. When we returned on a Saturday night without reservations, our server informed us that they were booked up for the next two hours. I must have looked crestfallen because the server looked at me pityingly.  In any case, L and I will be back next year.

outside

Korean · Restaurants

Seoul Korean BBQ – Buffet

On Monday, the sun was shining and the snow was melting. I was feeling celebratory and told L that I was taking my man out for dinner. I suggested BBQ. Unfortunately, Paddy’s BBQ + Brewery was not open. We opted for Seoul Korean BBQ. The rating for this place was pretty good on Yelp, so off we went. For reason that will soon follow, let’s listen to I’ve got that tune – by Chinese Man.

When we arrived, we found out that Seoul Korean BBQ has changed into an all-you-can-eat buffet style format. I dislike buffets and I prefer to order a la carte, but since L seemed excited, we stayed. For $30 bucks per person, we had the choice of the following meats: pork ribs, marinated rib-eye, pork belly, beef short ribs, beef bulgogi, spicy chicken, spicy pork, pork side ribs, and deep fried chicken.

side dishes

L went to select the raw meats while I picked up banchan (small side dishes): bean sprouts, kimchi, potatoes, spinach and tofu salad, and pickled vegetables. Normally banchan is the favourite part of my meal. These side dishes weren’t well seasoned and lacked flavour. I was disappointed.

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The hot food selection was vast: various soups, two types of rice, fried rice, noodles dishes, two types of fried chicken, dumplings, battered shrimp, mussels, vegetables, rice cakes, seafood pancake and many other dishes. All the hot food was cold or at best, room temperature. Of the bunch, the only one I liked was the pork dumplings and japchae (glass noodles). The shrimp was not properly deveined. I would skip the hot section.

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The pork belly was flavourless and tasted like it had been frozen for too long. I did enjoy the pork ribs, marinated rib eye, beef short ribs and beef bulgogi. L liked the spicy pork and beef ribs the most. For most of the time we were there, our grill wasn’t that hot. It turned out that the gas needed to be replaced.

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There were lots of groups of families and friends enjoying themselves. There was one group of older women having a hoot. They were loudly complaining about coworkers and relatives. I heard one lady say, “Oh God. But the Chinese are the worst.” There was a couple of laughs followed by dead silence.

BBQService was good. Someone was always around to pick up plates and answer questions or refill the tea. I can see the appeal of Seoul Korean BBQ for families that want to enjoy a lot of meat. Note that if you have any unfinished food, you’ll be charged $10.

Seoul Korean BBQ Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato